How to Make Money Off of Poetry?

You may be driven by the muse, but that doesn’t mean you have to be poor because of it. Whether you want to develop your creative side or just want to make some extra cash, you can find ways to do so off of poetry. There are plenty of ways to make money off of poetry, and if you know where to look, you can probably find a way even if you aren’t specifically looking for it. With some creativity and research, you can probably even make a decent living off of poetry. Here are just a few ways to make money off of poems:

Monetizing Content

Some creators can make decent money off of content whose value is mostly in terms of brand recognition. One of the most popular example of this is Getty Images, whose stock in trade is content—mostly photographic—categorized by the brand names of famous people and famous cultural events. The content may not have any inherent brand value, but the fact that it’s been tagged with the Getty brand name makes it worth a decent amount of money. This is one of the safest, if not the safest, ways to make money off of a poem; you don’t need to create any actual content, you just need to tag your work with the correct brand names (and the value of those brands).

Similarly, the Harry Potter franchise has made millions off of content whose value is mostly in terms of brand recognition. Even the most diehard Harry Potter fans have probably never heard of Galen Salazar Slytherin, nor would they have any idea what his face looks like if it weren’t for the Harry Potter series. Galen’s father, Godric, was a writer for the series. When Galen discovered his father’s Diagon Alley studio, he opened a vein and started pumping out content without a break. Since then, he’s mostly been in demand for translations and commentary on the series. This type of content is fairly easy to sell, as long as you can find a publisher who sees value in a brand name and is willing to take a chance on an unknown writer. Most importantly, make sure to get the legal rights to your content before doing anything. Otherwise, you could find yourself in a bit of a pickle.

Create Blogs and Websites

If you’ve got a sizable audience, you can make money off of your writing by creating a blog or website around it. The content on your blog could be anything from short stories to prose poems or even an audiobook. Think of all the different ways you can bring value to your audience. You could create a community of like-minded readers and writers on your blog. Or, you could provide them with content that they might not otherwise have seen—like an exclusive interview with a famous literary figure or maybe a behind-the-scenes look at the process of writing a novel.

If you’ve got a sizable audience on social media, you can make money off of your writing by creating and engaging with accounts on all the major platforms. This could be simply by posting regularly or by creating and engaging with hashtags on Twitter. You could also set up an Instagram account for yourself, which could become a gold mine for creative entrepreneurs looking to make a quick buck. The possibilities for making money off of social media are endless, especially if you want to explore the platform’s commercial side. Don’t be afraid to think outside of the box.

Consulting

If you’re the creative type who thrives on inspiration and variety, you can make a pretty penny doing the creative work of others. You’ll likely need either a client or multiple clients for this to work, as the fees can add up quickly. However, if you’re good at getting ideas across and convincing others to follow your lead, you could end up making a decent chunk of change without having to do all the work yourself. The basic idea is to find a need (be it for a product, service, or idea) and to satisfy that need with creative work. So, if you’re good at coming up with unique ideas for others to consider, you could end up as someone’s creative director, marketing strategist, or business consultant. All of which pay well and give you a sense of accomplishment that comes with a creative side.

Many creatives go the extra mile to find their customers and connect with them on a personal level. MasterCard and Square are just two examples of companies that provide personal finance tools specifically designed for small businesses. These companies might eventually become your biggest clients. Think of all the different ways you can uniquely serve your clients. What special offers can you provide them? What new products can you develop for them? What insight can you bring to their business that they might not have thought of?

There are plenty of ways to make money off of poetry, and it doesn’t necessarily have to be through traditional publishing. If you know where to look, you can probably find a way even if you aren’t specifically looking for it. Make sure to explore all the different types of revenue an author can generate, and find the one that works best for you.